Suite Groups

As we have seen before, the describe() function describes a test suite of related specs in a test bundle CFC. The title of the suite is concatenated with the title of a spec to create a full spec's name which is very descriptive. If you name them well, they will read out as full sentences as defined by BDD style.

describe("A spec", function() {
     it("is just a closure, so it can contain any code", function() {
          coldbox = 0;
          coldbox++;

          expect( coldbox ).toBe( 1 );
     });

     it("can have more than one expectation", function() {
          coldbox = 0;
          coldbox++;

          expect( coldbox ).toBe( 1 );
          expect( coldbox ).toBeTrue();
     });
});

Nesting describe Blocks

Calls to our describe() function can be nested with specs at any level or point of execution. This allows you to create your tests as a related tree of nested functions. Please note that before a spec is executed, TestBox walks down the tree executing each beforeEach() and afterEach() function in the declared order. This is a great way to logically group specs in any level as you see fit.

describe("A spec", function() {

     beforeEach(function( currentSpec ) {
          coldbox = 22;
          application.wirebox = new coldbox.system.ioc.Injector();
     });

     afterEach(function( currentSpec ) {
          coldbox = 0;
          structDelete( application, "wirebox" );
     });

     it("is just a function, so it can contain any code", function() {
          expect( coldbox ).toBe( 22 );
     });

     it("can have more than one expectation and talk to scopes", function() {
          expect( coldbox ).toBe( 22 );
          expect( application.wirebox.getInstance( 'MyService' ) ).toBeComponent();
     });

     describe("nested inside a second describe", function() {

          beforeEach(function( currentSpec ) {
               awesome = 22;
          });

          afterEach(function( currentSpec ) {
               awesome = 22 + 8;
          });

          it("can reference both scopes as needed ", function() {
            expect( coldbox ).toBe( awesome );
          });
     });

     it("can be declared after nested suites and have access to nested variables", function() {
          expect( awesome ).toBe( 30 );
     });

});

Given-When-Then Blocks

Given-When-Then is a style of writing tests where you describe the state of the code you want to test (Given), the behavior you want to test (When) and the expected outcome (Then). (See Specification By Example)

Testbox supports the use of function names given() and when() in-place of describe() function calls. The then() function call is an alternative for it() function calls. The advantage of this style of behavioural specifications is that you can gather your requirements and write your tests in a common language that can be understood by developers and stake-holders alike. This common language format is often referred to as the Gherkin language; using it we can gather and document the requirements as:

Feature: Box Size
    In order to know what size box I need
    As a distribution manager
    I want to know the volume of the box

    Scenario: Get box volume
        Given I have entered a width of 20
        And a height of 30
        And a depth of 40
        When I run the calculation
        Then the result should be 24000

TestBox provides you with feature(), scenario() and story() wrappers for describe() blocks. As such we can write our requirements in test form like so:

feature( "Box Size", function(){

    describe( "In order to know what size box I need
              As a distribution manager
              I want to know the volume of the box", function(){

        scenario( "Get box volume", function(){
            given( "I have entered a width of 20
                And a height of 30
                And a depth of 40", function(){
                when( "I run the calculation", function(){
                      then( "the result should be 24000", function(){
                          // call the method with the arguments and test the outcome
                          expect( myObject.myFunction(20,30,40) ).toBe( 24000 );
                      });
                 });
            });
        });
    });
});

The output from running the test will read as the original requirements, providing you with not only automated tests but also a living document of the requirements in a business-readable format.

If you prefer to gather requirements as User Stories then you may prefer to take advantage of the story() wrapper for describe() instead.

story("As a distribution manager, I want to know the volume of the box I need", function() {
    given("I have a width of 20
        And a height of 30
        And a depth of 40", function() {
        when("I run the calculation", function() {
              then("the result should be 24000", function() {
                  // call the method with the arguments and test the outcome
                  expect(myObject.myFunction(20,30,40)).toBe(24000);
              });
         });
    });
});

As feature(), scenario() and story() are wrappers for describe() you can intermix them so that your can create tests which read as the business requirements. As with describe(), they can be nested to build up blocks.

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